Bauman Associates’ Tax Team Voted #1

BY Bauman Associates

For the last eleven years, Volume One has turned to its readers to vote for their local favorites. From yummy places to eat to emerging bands to trusted tax services,  the community of Chippewa Valley weighs in on the best of the best.


As Volume One puts it, “the goal here is to make the Chippewa Valley a better place to live through the voices and votes of those who live here. Because really, the best burger joints or the best parks aren’t going to be the reason this is a great place to live. It’s the people here who populate those places and try new things and genuinely care about making their home great. After all, this is your home. Your neighbors are your neighbors. It’s up to both of you — not one or the other — to make this place great. There’s something kinda beautiful in that.”

Bauman Associates is honored to make Chippewa Valley’s Best Of list in 2018. Click to learn more about our Tax Services.


Bauman Associates Promotes Bernie Hull as COO and Director of HR

BY Bauman Associates

We are pleased to announce the promotion of BernadetteBernie” Hull, CPA, PHR, SHRM-CP to COO and Director of HR.

“We believe that developing great people is critical to the success of our firm and our clients. As with any business, it’s important that we have someone dedicated to overseeing the day to day operations of the business. Bernie knows our business, community and people exceptionally well,” stated Managing Principal John Satre.

Bernie has been with the firm since 1981 and is a principal in the firm. Further, in addition to her background as a CPA, Bernie regularly consults with the firm’s business clients on matters of operations and HR. Bernie will continue to lead the HR consulting services and assist with tax consulting services for clients in her role as COO and Director of HR for the firm.

“I am excited about my new role at Bauman Associates as we celebrate our 70th anniversary of service to our community and look forward to the exciting years ahead, working with our exceptional Bauman team and clients,” commented Bernie Hull. “I am truly grateful for this opportunity.”

Bernie has served in multiple roles in the firm as a CPA in the accounting, auditing and tax areas. She served as the firm’s first firm administrator from 1988 to 2003, obtaining her certification as an HR professional during that period. These experiences helped her to become uniquely qualified to assist clients with tax consulting, business administration, and HR management and consulting matters, becoming a principal in 2010.

Bauman Associates has a rich history of service in the community. It has grown over the years and has become one of the premier accounting and consulting firms in the Chippewa Valley and Hudson, WI marketplaces.

What You Need to Know About the Incoming Tax Law

BY Casper Haas

The tax reform legislation that Congress approved last month was the largest change to the tax system in over 3 decades. The last time the U.S. tax code saw such a significant reform was under President Reagan in 1986. Those reforms sought to simplify income tax, broaden the tax base and eliminate many tax shelters.

Under this new legislation, substantial changes have been made to both individual and corporate tax rates. While most of the corporate provisions are permanent, the individual provisions technically expire by the end of 2025. There is speculation whether a future Congress will uphold the Individual provisions.

The new tax code contains many provisions that will affect individual, estate, and corporate taxpayers. To help you prepare, we have highlighted a few of the most pertinent details below. Please keep in mind, the purpose of this article is to summarize the key provisions.

What’s Changing?

Tax Bracket Rates. While taxpayers will still fall into one of seven tax brackets based on their income, the rates have changed. Some of the brackets have been lowered. The new rates are: 10%, 12%, 22%, 24%, 32%, 35% and 37%.

Standard Deduction. The standard deduction has nearly doubled. For single filers it has increased from $6,350 to $12,000; for married couples filing jointly, it’s increased from $12,700 to $24,000.

Personal Exemption. Under the prior tax code, a taxpayer could claim a $4,050 personal exemption for themselves, their spouse and each of their dependents, thus lowering their taxable income. Under the new tax code, the personal exemption has been eliminated. For some families, this will reduce or counter the tax relief they receive from other parts of the reform package.

State and Local Tax Deduction. The state and local tax deduction, or SALT, now has a cap. While it remains in place for those who itemize their taxes, it now has a $10,000 limit. This is a significant change as filers could previously deduct an unlimited amount for state and local property taxes, plus income or sales taxes.

The Child Tax Credit. The child tax credit has been expanded, doubling to $2,000 for children under 17. It’s also available to more people. Single parents who make up to $200,000, and married couples who make up to $400,000 can claim the entire credit, in full.

Non-Child Dependents. A new tax credit is available for non-child dependents. Taxpayers can claim a $500 temporary credit for non-child dependents. This can apply to a number of people adults support, such as children over age 17, elderly parents or adult children with a disability.

Alternative Minimum Tax. Fewer taxpayers will be affected by the alternative minimum tax. The purpose of the AMT is to ensure those who receive a lot of tax breaks are still paying some level of federal income taxes. The exemption will rise to $70,300 for singles, and to $109,400 for married couples.

Mortgage Interest Deduction. Going forward, anyone purchasing a home will only be able to deduct the first $750,000 of their mortgage debt. Down from $1 million, this will likely only affect people buying homes in more expensive regions. Current homeowners will likely be unaffected.

529 Savings Accounts. In the past, 529 savings accounts were untaxed and could only be applied towards college expenses.  Under the new tax code, up to $10,000 can be distributed annually to cover the cost of sending a child to a public, private or religious elementary or secondary school.

Alimony Payment Tax Deduction. The tax deduction for alimony payments will be eliminated for couples who sign divorce or separation paperwork after December 31, 2018.

Moving Expenses Deduction. The tax deduction for moving expenses is also gone, but may be exceptions for members of the military.

Tax Preparation Deduction. Taxpayers can no longer deduct the cost of having their taxes prepared by a professional or the money they may have spent on tax preparation software.

Disaster Deduction.  Under the prior tax code, losses sustained due to a fire, storm, shipwreck or theft that insurance did not cover and exceeded 10% of their adjusted gross income, were deductible. Effective under the new tax code, taxpayers can only claim the disaster deduction if they are affected by an official national disaster.

Estate Tax. Prior to the tax reform, a limited number of estates were subject to the estate tax, a tax which applies to the transfer of property after someone dies. Now, even fewer taxpayers will be affected. The amount of money exempt from the tax — previously set at $5.49 million for individuals, and at $10.98 million for married couples — has been doubled.

Health Insurance Mandate. The failure to repeal Obamacare earlier this year afforded the Republicans the opportunity to eliminate one of the health law’s key provisions with tax reform. Effective in 2019, the individual mandate, which penalized people who did not have health care coverage, was eliminated.

Corporate Tax Rate. Beginning in 2018, the corporate tax rate has been cut from 35% to 21%.

Pass-through Entities. The owners, partners and shareholders of S-corporations, LLCs and partnerships will receive a tax break. Those who pay their share of the business’ taxes through their individual tax returns will have a 20% deduction.

To ensure business owners do not abuse the provision, the legislation has included additional terms to this provision.

Multinational Corporations. The new tax bill is a shift towards globalization, changing the way multinational corporations are taxed. Companies will no longer pay federal taxes on income they make overseas. These companies will be required to pay a one-time, 15.5% on cash assets and 8% on non-cash assets, on any existing offshore profits.

Nonprofit Organizations. There is a new 21% excise tax on nonprofit employers for salaries they pay out above $1 million.

Sexual Harassment Settlements. Companies can no longer deduct any settlements, payouts or attorney’s fees related to sexual harassment if the payments are subject to non-disclosure agreements.

Bonus Depreciation. The Bonus depreciation will increase from 50% to 100% for property placed in service after September 27, 2017, and before January 1, 2023, when a 20% phase-down schedule will begin. The previous rule that made bonus depreciation available only for new properties was also removed.

Vehicle Depreciation. The new tax bill raises the cap placed on depreciation write-offs of business-use vehicles. $10,000 for the first year a vehicle is placed in service; $16,000 for the second year; $9,600 for the third year; and $5,760 for each subsequent year until costs are fully recovered. The new limits only apply to vehicles placed in service after December 31, 2017.

What’s Staying the Same?

Student Loan Interest. You can still deduct Student Loan Interest – the deduction for this will remain max $2,500.

Medical Expenses. The deduction for medical expense was untouched. Rather, it was expanded by two years. Filers can deduct medical expenses that exceed 7.5% of their adjusted gross income for 2017 and 2018 tax years.

Teachers. Teachers will continue to deduct up to $250 to offset what they spend on resources for the classroom.

Electric Car Credit. If you drive a plug-in electric vehicle, you can still claim a credit of up to $7,500.

Home Sellers. Homeowners that sell their house and make a profit can exclude up to $500,000 (or $250,000 for single filers) from capital gains. The law still requires that it is their primary home and they have lived there for at least two of the past five years.

Tuition Waivers. Tuition Waivers, typically awarded to teaching and research assistants, will remain tax free.

What Does This All Mean?

Although doubling the standard deduction will arguably simplify the process of filing taxes for individuals, there are still deductions and credits to consider. More so, the filing for small businesses, can potentially become more complicated. Depending on your situation, it may be beneficial to review your filing status as part of an overall tax planning strategy.

Again, please keep in mind that the purpose of this article is to summarize the key provisions. Each client scenario will be different, and this has to be taken into account. The professionals in our office can answer the questions you may have regarding the individual, estate and corporate tax provisions outlined in the Republican’s tax reform bill.  Please give us a call if you have any questions.


BY Bauman Associates

Congress enacted the biggest tax reform law in thirty years, one that will make fundamental changes in the way you, your family and your business calculate your federal income tax bill, and the amount of federal tax you will pay. Since most of the changes will go into effect next year, there’s still a narrow window of time before year-end to soften or avoid the impact of crackdowns and to best position yourself for the tax breaks that may be heading your way. Here’s a quick rundown of last-minute moves you should think about making.

Lower tax rates coming.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act will reduce tax rates for many taxpayers, effective for the 2018 tax year. Additionally, many businesses, including those operated as passthroughs, such as partnerships, may see their tax bills cut.  The general plan of action to take advantage of lower tax rates next year is to defer income into next year.

Some possibilities follow:

  • If you are about to convert a regular IRA to a Roth IRA, postpone your move until next year. That way you’ll defer income from the conversion until next year and have it taxed at lower rates.
  • Earlier this year, you may have already converted a regular IRA to a Roth IRA but now you question the wisdom of that move, as the tax on the conversion will be subject to a lower tax rate next year. You can unwind the conversion to the Roth IRA by doing a recharacterization—making a trustee-to-trustee transfer from the Roth to a regular IRA. This way, the original conversion to a Roth IRA will be cancelled out. But you must complete the recharacterization before year-end. Starting next year, you won’t be able to use a recharacterization to unwind a regular-IRA-to-Roth-IRA conversion.
  • If you run a business that renders services and operates on the cash basis, the income you earn isn’t taxed until your clients or patients pay. So if you hold off on billings until next year—or until so late in the year that no payment will likely be received this year—you will likely succeed in deferring income until next year.
  • If your business is on the accrual basis, deferral of income till next year is difficult but not impossible. For example, you might, with due regard to business considerations, be able to postpone completion of a last-minute job until 2018, or defer deliveries of merchandise until next year (if doing so won’t upset your customers). Taking one or more of these steps would postpone your right to payment, and the income from the job or the merchandise, until next year. Keep in mind that the rules in this area are complex and may require a tax professional’s input.
  • The reduction or cancellation of debt generally results in taxable income to the debtor. So if you are planning to make a deal with creditors involving debt reduction, consider postponing action until January to defer any debt cancellation income into 2018.

Disappearing or reduced deductions, larger standard deduction.

Beginning next year, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act suspends or reduces many popular tax deductions in exchange for a larger standard deduction.

Here’s what you can do about this right now:

  • Individuals (as opposed to businesses) will only be able to claim an itemized deduction of up to $10,000 ($5,000 for a married taxpayer filing a separate return) for the total of
    1. State and local property taxes;
    2. State and local income taxes.

To avoid this limitation, pay the last installment of estimated state and local taxes for 2017 no later than Dec. 31, 2017, rather than on the 2018 due date. But don’t prepay in 2017 a state income tax bill that will be imposed next year – Congress says such a prepayment won’t be deductible in 2017. However, Congress only forbade prepayments for state income taxes, not property taxes, so a prepayment on or before Dec. 31, 2017, of a 2018 property tax installment is apparently OK.

  • The itemized deduction for charitable contributions won’t be chopped. But because most other itemized deductions will be eliminated in exchange for a larger standard deduction (e.g., $24,000 for joint filers), charitable contributions after 2017 may not yield a tax benefit for many because they won’t be able to itemize deductions. If you think you will fall in this category, consider accelerating some charitable giving into 2017.
  • The new law temporarily boosts itemized deductions for medical expenses. For 2017 and 2018 these expenses can be claimed as itemized deductions to the extent they exceed a floor equal to 7.5% of your adjusted gross income (AGI). Before the new law, the floor was 10% of AGI, except for 2017 it was 7.5% of AGI for age-65-or-older taxpayers. But keep in mind that next year many individuals will have to claim the standard deduction because many itemized deductions have been eliminated. If you won’t be able to itemize deductions after this year, but will be able to do so this year, consider accelerating “discretionary” medical expenses into this year. For example, before the end of the year, get new glasses or contacts, or see if you can squeeze in expensive dental work such as an implant.

Other year-end strategies.

Here are some other last minute moves that can save tax dollars in view of the new tax law:

  • The new law substantially increases the alternative minimum tax (AMT) exemption amount, beginning next year. There may be steps you can take now to take advantage of that increase. For example, the exercise of an incentive stock option (ISO) can result in AMT complications. So, if you hold any ISOs, it may be wise to postpone exercising them until next year. And, for various deductions, e.g., depreciation and the investment interest expense deduction, the deduction will be curtailed if you are subject to the AMT. If the higher 2018 AMT exemption means you won’t be subject to the 2018 AMT, it may be worthwhile, via tax elections or postponed transactions, to push such deductions into 2018.
  • Like-kind exchanges are a popular way to avoid current tax on the appreciation of an asset, but after Dec. 31, 2017, such swaps will be possible only if they involve real estate that isn’t held primarily for sale. So if you are considering a like-kind swap of other types of property, do so before year-end. The new law says the old, far more liberal like-kind exchange rules will continue apply to exchanges of personal property if you either dispose of the relinquished property or acquire the replacement property on or before Dec. 31, 2017.
  • For decades, businesses have been able to deduct 50% of the cost of entertainment directly related to or associated with the active conduct of a business. For example, if you take a client to a nightclub after a business meeting, you can deduct 50% of the cost if strict substantiation requirements are met. But under the new law, for amounts paid or incurred after Dec. 31, 2017, there’s no deduction for such expenses. So if you’ve been thinking of entertaining clients and business associates, do so before year-end.
  • The new law suspends the deduction for moving expenses after 2017 (except for certain members of the Armed Forces), and also suspends the tax-free reimbursement of employment-related moving expenses. So if you’re in the midst of a job-related move, try to incur your deductible moving expenses before year-end, or if the move is connected with a new job and you’re getting reimbursed by your new employer, press for a reimbursement to be made to you before year-end.
  • Under current law, various employee business expenses, e.g., employee home office expenses, are deductible as itemized deductions if those expenses plus certain other expenses exceed 2% of adjusted gross income. The new law suspends the deduction for employee business expenses paid after 2017. So, we should determine whether paying additional employee business expenses in 2017, that you would otherwise pay in 2018, would provide you with an additional 2017 tax benefit. Also, now would be a good time to talk to your employer about changing your compensation arrangement—for example, your employer reimbursing you for the types of employee business expenses that you have been paying yourself up to now, and lowering your salary by an amount that approximates those expenses. In most cases, such reimbursements would not be subject to tax.

Please keep in mind that we’ve described only some of the year-end moves that should be considered in light of the new tax law. If you would like more details about any aspect of how the new law may affect you, please do not hesitate to call.

Planning Ahead: 2017 Health Savings Account Limits

BY Chad Ryder

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has released the annual contribution limitations for health savings accounts (HSAs) and the minimum deductible amounts and maximum out-of-pocket expense amounts for high-deductible health plans. These limitations are updated annually to reflect cost-of-living adjustments. Business owners should inform employees of the HSA contribution limits increase for 2017.

Employers commonly offer employees HSA contributions as part of their healthcare benefit packages. HSAs are a popular option because of its dual purpose. Employees can utilize HSAs to save for the future or pay for qualified medical expenses tax free.

Under Sec. 223 of Rev. Proc. 2016-28, individuals who participate in a health plan with a high deductible are permitted a deduction for contributions to HSAs set up to help pay their medical expenses. To be eligible to contribute to an HSA you must participate in a high deductible health plan.

The following chart summarizes the contribution and out-of-pocket limits for HSAs and high-deductible health plans for 2017. There was only one minor change between 2016 and 2017.

  2016 2017 Change
HSA contribution limit Self: $3,350

Family: $6,750

Self: $3,400

Family: $6,750

Self: $50

Family: No Change

HSA catch up contribution (age 55+) $1,000 $1,000 No Change
HDHP minimum deductible Self: $1,300

Family: $2,600

Self: $1,300

Family: $2,600

No Change
HDHP maximum out of pocket Self: $6,550

Family: $13,100

Self: $6,550

Family: $13,100

No Change

Employers should remind employees who are contributing to or using their HSA:

  • They have until April 15, 2018 to make contributions for the 2017 tax year.
  • Withdrawing from their HSA for nonqualified purposes is subject to income tax.
  • Nonqualified withdrawals are also subject to a 20% tax penalty unless an exception applies.

The professionals in our office can clarify any questions you may have on HSAs. Call on us today.

Dinner With Bauman

BY Bauman Associates


Students, don’t miss out on a free Dinner with Bauman!

Contrary to popular belief, there IS such a thing as a FREE dinner! Join accounting professionals from Bauman Associates on October 19th for pizza, door prizes and a unique opportunity to find out what it is like to work in a public accounting firm. Students will also learn about the employment opportunities Bauman offers and network with leaders in the field. This event will take place in Centennial Hall at UWEC, Room 320 from 4:00 – 6:30 pm. Space is limited and there is a deadline, so fill out and submit your application today (or by Thursday, October 12th). We look forward to seeing you there!

 Click here for Dinner with Bauman Application

Education Tax Credits: Two Benefits to Help You Pay for College

BY Justin Koppa

If you paid for college it can mean tax savings on your federal tax return. There are two education credits that can help you with the cost of higher education. These credits include the American Opportunity Credit and the Lifetime Learning Credit.  Here are some important facts you should know about these education tax credits.

The American Opportunity Tax Credit allows you to claim up to $2,500 per eligible student. Some tips to consider under this tax credit:

  • The credit only applies to the first four years at an eligible educational institution.
  • It reduces the amount of tax you owe. If the credit reduces your tax to less than zero, you may receive up to $1,000 as a refund.
  • It is available for students earning a degree or other recognized credentials.
  • The credit applies to students going to school at least half-time for at least one academic period that started during the tax year.
  • Costs that apply to the credit include the cost of tuition, books, required fees and supplies.

The Lifetime Learning Credit is limited to $2,000 per tax return, per year. Some tips to consider under this tax credit:

  • This credit is available for an unlimited number of years as it applies to all years of higher education at an eligible educational institution. This includes classes for learning or improving job skills.
  • The credit is limited to the amount of your taxes.
  • Costs that apply to the credit include cost of tuition, required fees, books, supplies and equipment.

Let Us Help You Leverage What You Can Learn from Your Tax Return

BY Jay Grokowsky

What does your tax return say about your financial situation? The fact is, the paperwork you file each year offers excellent information about how you are managing your money—and about areas where it might be wise to make changes in your financial habits. If you have questions about your financial situation, remember that we can help. Our firm is made up of highly qualified and educated professionals who work with clients like you all year long, serving as trusted business advisors.

So whether you are concerned about budgeting; saving for college, retirement or another goal; understanding your investments; cutting your tax bite; starting a business; or managing your debt, you can turn to us for objective answers to all your tax and financial questions.

We Can Help You Address the Issues that Keep You Up at Night

Where will your business be in five years? Would strategic budget cuts in some areas improve your company’s health? Are there ways you can boost revenue? If you are nearing retirement, is there a buyer or successor in the wings? These are the kinds of questions that keep many business owners up at night. Fortunately, we can help you address these questions and maybe sleep a little easier.

We can review your financial situation and develop creative strategies to minimize your tax liability and help you meet your financial goals. Contact one of our professionals today.

2017 Standard Mileage Rates Announced for Business, Charitable, Medical and Moving Purposes

BY Justin Koppa

The Internal Revenue Service recently issued the 2017 optional standard mileage rates to be used to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile for business, charitable, medical or moving purposes.

As of January 1, 2017, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car (also vans, pickups or panel trucks) are:

  • 53.5 cents per mile for business miles driven (54 cents for 2016)
  • 14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations (14 cents for 2016)
  • 17 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes (19 cents for 2016)

It is important to remember that a taxpayer may not use the business standard mileage rate for a vehicle after using any depreciation method under the Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS) or after claiming a Section 179 deduction for that vehicle.

Taxpayers always have the option of calculating the actual costs of using their vehicle rather than using the standard mileage rates. For more information, please contact one of our professionals today.

New Form I-9 for Employment Eligibility Verification, Effective 1/22/2017

BY Bernie Hull

Congress passed the IRCA (Immigration Reform and Control Act) in 1986, which required the use of the Form I-9 to verify identity and employment authorization for all new employees, including U.S. citizens hired after November 6, 1986. New hires are required to complete this form within three (3) business days of the date of hire. Employers are required to retain the completed Forms I-9 for all employees, as long as the individuals work for the employer and until one year after the date the employment is terminated or three years after date of hire, whichever is later.

On November 14, 2016, USCIS (U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services), published a revised version of the Form I-9. Employers must begin using the new version by January 22, 2017.  The form has been modified to make it easier to complete on a computer, including prompts to ensure information is entered correctly and drop down lists and other enhancements.

You may obtain a copy of the new form (paper version and fillable PDF version) and a copy of the Handbook for Employers—Guidance for Completing Form I-9 (publication M-274) at the official website  There is no fee to obtain these forms via this website.