Overtime Extension Blocked by Texas Judge

BY Bauman Associates

Just before Thanksgiving, Texas U.S. District Judge Amos Mazzant granted a nationwide injunction against the overtime extension rules that were set to go into effect on December 1. The blocked rules would have increased the maximum salary from $23,660 to $47,500 for a worker to be eligible for overtime pay, impacting an estimated 4.2 million working Americans. Mazzant issued the injunction following arguments against the rule from 21 states and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, who argued that the extended overtime ruling was unlawful. While the injunction has put a halt to things for now, we expect the discussion is far from over. Let us know if you have any questions on how this could affect you. If you’d like to learn a bit more, check out these articles:

Preparing Your Business for New Filing Deadlines

BY Robert Sorensen

In July of 2015, President Obama signed into law a new Highway Funding Bill. Section 2006 of that bill modifies the tax filing due dates for tax years beginning after December 31, 2015. The filing deadlines for a variety of entities, including partnerships and C corporations, will change.

As a business owner, it is important to be aware of the new filing deadlines to make sure you are submitting tax returns timely. The following two questions will determine your due date:

  1.  What entity is your business considered?
  2.  When is your tax year end date?

The new due dates are effective for tax years beginning after December 31, 2015 with the exception of C Corporations with fiscal years ending on June 30 (new due dates for June 30 year ends will go into effect for returns with taxable years beginning after December 31, 2025).

We have highlighted below some of the major changes. For a complete list of new due dates, please refer to our giveaway this month, a copy of the AICPA’s resource which includes a list of all original and extended tax return due dates.

Return Type Prior Due Dates New Due Dates
Partnership (calendar year) April 15 March 15
S Corporation (calendar year) March 15 No change
C Corporation (calendar year) March 15 April 15
FinCEN Report 114

(Replaces FBAR return)

June 30 April 15
Individual Form 1040 April 15 No change
 

Extension Modifications for Calendar Year Filers

Form Extension
1065 6 Months
1041 5 ½ months
5500 3 ½ months
990 6 months
3520-A and 3520 6 months
FinCEN report 114 6 months
 

Extension Modifications for C Corporations

June 30 FYE 7 months
December 31 FYE 5 months
All other FYE’s 6 months
After 12/31/25 All revert back to 6 months

Will individual tax filers be affected by the new due dates?

Yes, those who file foreign bank account reports will notice a change. The due date for FBARs will move from June 30 to April 15. FBAR filers are also applicable to receive a six-month extension, similar to tax returns.

 Trust Returns

The extension dates for trust returns are receiving an extension. Trust returns are still due in April, but the extension will change from September 15 to September 30.

You will want to review your return-filing procedures and determine what changes need to be made to comply with the new dates. The professionals in our office can help you understand how this will affect your business; call on us today.